Our network

Health

Report Finds Hospitals Are Economic Anchors of Western New York

Report Finds Hospitals Are Economic Anchors of Western New York

ALBANY, N.Y — A recent Healthcare Association of New York State (HANYS) report found that Western New York’s hospitals maintain 51,440 jobs and generate $6.4 billion in economic activity.  Statewide, hospitals and health systems are responsible for 686,610 jobs and generate $108 billion in economic activity each year, or 9.4% of the Gross State Product.

Not only are hospitals among the top employers in the region, hospitals and their employees generate tremendous direct and indirect economic activity by purchasing goods and services from other businesses, and by investing in capital improvements.  Additionally, access to health care is a critical factor in statewide economic development and a prerequisite for attracting companies looking to expand or relocate.

“Hospitals clearly serve as economic anchors of Western New York,” said HANYS’ President Daniel Si

Outcomes for Patients of Cystic Fibrosis Center at Women & Children’s Hospital Among Best in US

The Cystic Fibrosis Center of Western New York at Women & Children’s Hospital of Buffalo is among the highest performing centers in the United States according to data compiled by the National Cystic Fibrosis Foundation measuring the most relevant clinical outcomes for patients.

Measures of pulmonary and nutritional status are the strongest predictors of future health in people with cystic fibrosis, a life-shortening genetic disease that causes thick mucus in the lungs and trouble digesting food.  Data measuring lung function (FEV1) and body mass index (a nutritional indicator) for patients receiving care from the Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Center of WNY both are ranked among the highest performing centers nationally.

For the measure of lung function (FEV1), the percentage predicted for patients 18 to 29 years in 2009 (most recent data available) at Women & Children’s Hospital of Buffalo was 82.  The national median for this percentage related to lung fun

New Location for Erie County Department Of Health STD Clinic

New Location for Erie County Department Of Health STD Clinic

The Erie County Department of Health will be re-locating its Preventive Health Services Clinic from the current second floor Rath Building location to a recently renovated site in the Jesse Nash Health Center located at 608 William Street in Buffalo.

The Preventive Health Services Clinic offers treatment and counseling for patients and contacts who may have contracted a sexually transmitted disease (STD), along with HIV testing, and community educational outreach. All services will continue to be free and confidential.

Service hours for the clinic will be Monday - Thursday 8:30 a.m.- noon, and 1:00 p.m.- 4:00 p.m.; and Friday 10:00 a.m.- noon, and 1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.  Free parking is also available at this location.

In order to complete the move, the clinic in the Rath Building will be closing Friday, December 10th at 12 noon, and will re-open at the new site on Tuesday, December 14th at 8:30 a.m.

National Grid Offers Energy, Money-Saving Tips for Safe, Bright Holiday

National Grid Offers Energy, Money-Saving Tips for Safe, Bright Holiday

National Grid customers don’t have to be Scrooges to save money on lighting and festivities this holiday season.  By following some simple energy efficiency and safety tips, customers can benefit from a more environmentally friendly, safe and cost-effective season.

 

Save Big on Lighting

Over the past few years, new lighting alternatives have become available that may cost more initially, but cost much less to maintain and operate.  Energy-efficient miniature or light-emitting diode (LED) lights use considerably less energy than traditional lighting technology. The list below provides customers with the potential costs associated with each type of lighting.

Local High School Coaches Become Certified in Concussion Reduction Training

Local High School Coaches Become Certified in Concussion Reduction Training

Coaches from West Seneca East Senior High School are the first from a Western New York school to become certified in Primordial Strength Inc.’s Concussion Reduction Basic Neck Training as part of their football strength training certification, according to Primordial President Steven Helmicki. Concussion certification and explosive power endurance certification is available for all sports and can be taught in your school.

Maria M. Love and The Fitch Crèche of Buffalo

Maria M. Love and The Fitch Crèche of Buffalo
  •   The Fitch Crèche, nationally recognized as the first day care center for the children of working women in the United States, one which would serve as a model to be emulated by other American cities.  It was the first to implement a Froebel kindergarten in the U.S.  
  •   Maria M. Love was a prominent Buffalonian and social services pioneer.  In 1881, she established the Fitch Crèche, at 159 Swan Street in Buffalo, near the corner of Michigan Avenue. Ms. Love founded the Fitch Crèche, after a trip to France where she became aware of the plight of children of working mothers.  The building was a dry goods store that was owned by Benjamin Fitch, a native Buffalonian who donated this building for use by the Crèche which formally opened January 6, 1881. By 1881, Mr.

March of Dimes Partners with Statewide Health Agencies to Address Late Preterm Birth

In an effort to reduce the number of late preterm births, the March of Dimes New York Chapter announced today it will partner with the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) and the New York State Chapter of the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG District II) to help educate health care providers and the public on the importance of the last weeks of pregnancy and the risk of early deliveries.  A healthy, full term-pregnancy lasts 39-40 weeks, yet there has been a rise in births scheduled prior to that time through inductions and C-sections that are not medically necessary - a practice once thought to be safe.  Research shows that scheduling births, even a few weeks too early, may result in babies having feeding, breathing and learning problems.  They are also more likely to die of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS).